Category Archives: Blog

Back from Publishing Pandemonium

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It’s been some time since I’ve updated my writer’s blog. Last post I was traveling in Thailand and Cambodia, gathering information and inspiration for a new Sammy novel. Since I returned, over a year ago, I’ve been busy publishing the first in the Sammy and the San Juan Express series—Seals the Deal. I thought writing was a challenge until I waded into the world of publishing. Little did I know the work that would be involved in contacting agents, talking with publishers, and ultimately learning publishing and the world of marketing books. I’m happy to say, the novel is now available at www.sanjuanexpress.com, Amazon.com, and at Barnes & Noble online. in both paperback and Kindle.

Do first time writers have a chance in the world of publishing if they don’t know anyone in the industry? Little, I would say. I contacted almost one hundred agents, only to receive almost one hundred rejections, some, I should say, with nice compliments, but no takers. I gave up after that and want directly to online publishing.

I’m now finishing book two in the Sammy series and may try again with traditional publishing. I’ll keep you posted.

Tracking My Emotional Response to Agent Query Emails

Sammy and The San Juan Express—Creed
Sammy’s Creed—

I’m sendin out an average of five agent queries a day. As I do the research and prepare each letter, I’m also watching the emotional roller coaster ride I’m taking. Emotions are important to me, partially because of my training as a counselor, and mostly because my protagonist in, Sammy and The San Juan Express, is a highly emotional being.

This morning, I noticed that for some agents I’m positive and feel good about sending my query. I can hardly wait to hit the send button. I know they will respond soon with a request for my manuscript. Then, I bump into someone who represents the best writers I’ve ever  known, or their credentials include a doctorate in English Lit, and my self confidence falls through the floor. I can barely type their email address let alone include the first fifty pages, which I’m sure should be thrown in the dumpster or deleted immediately.

Reality check— take a deep breath, stand, stretch, downward dog or a short walk. I have to remind myself that agents, as my daughter said, “put their pants on one leg at a time.” The truth is, agents need good writers. They’re looking for the next Harry Potter or The Book Thief, and every query holds the promise of being just that—even mine (or yours). So back at it you bad-boy or girl. Click those keys, search those agents, and with the confidence of J. K. Rolling, get those queries out—now.

Elk Herd Crossing the Necanicum River

Elk Crossing Necanicum—
Elk Crossing Necanicum—

In summer, and some holidays, we let our cabin, on the Necanicum River, out as a vacation rental. Often guests will leave us with comments expressing amazement at the profusion of wildlife they’ve seen from the front windows. It’s unusual, however, to see images. Our last guest was kind enough to send an image of the elk herd that, one evening over Thanksgiving week, left them awestruck. It must have been quite a scene to watch over sixty elk meander through the yard and swim across the river. A good time for Thanksgiving. 

A New Milestone

Ocean Below
Don’t Jump—

Eighteen queries emailed and my first milestone—I received my first rejection email. My first for Sammy and The San Juan Express, that is. I’m not sure if I should be pleased or upset. On the one hand, one agent … wait, another email. Make that two agents, did not feel my novel fit their needs. On the other hand, this puts me in some good company. If the web is correct:  Agatha Christie received five years of rejections, J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter)= twelve rejections, Louis L’Amour= 200, Dr. Seuss= numerous rejections with a note: “Too different from other juveniles,” Chicken Soup for the Soul=140, Stephenie Meyer’s (Twilight)= fourteen rejections, and one of my favorite authors, Jack London = 600. Needless to say, even the very best receive rejections, and even some of the very worst are published.

And, as Literaryrejections.com says, “Rejection is an imperative test of one’s character.” 

Isn’t life grand.

 

Idea for Sammy and The San Juan Express

Life Is Good
Life Is Good

Where did the idea for Sammy and The San Juan Express come from? Years ago I vacationed with my two children in the San Juan Islands. We’d spend two or more weeks on a 28′ Chris Craft with a small sailing dinghy in tow. It was magical watching how they adapted to their new environment. Two urban kids suddenly transformed into sailors, fisherman, divers, and explorers. During the day they would swim in warm coves, or spend lazy afternoons in the dinghy. In the evenings, with no television or radio, we’d play card games, and I would make up stories about pirates, goblins, and lost children living on the islands. And so, some thirty years ago, the seeds of The San Juan Express were planted. Many years later, they began to sprout. 

Elevator Pitch on the back of my business card

SAMMY and The San Juan Express (On the beach)
Sammy on the Beach

What is Sammy and The San Juan Express? As a critique partner put it, “A young adult, middle grade novel about an orphan girl.”

The elevator pitch on the back of my business card:  Thirteen year old Sammy is faced with her mother’s death, a drunken father, and being shipped off to live with her uncle, a bush pilot in the San Juan Islands. In two enlightening weeks she saves a sea lion, uncovers a plot to kill seals, is kidnapped to be murdered, and discovers her hidden gift. Only her strength, courage, wits, and a little help from her friends above and below water, determines whether she dies or lives to enjoy her new found power.

Creating Agent Query Letters

Sammy and The San Juan Express — Float Plane — Angie
Angie, Uncle Teddy’s float plane —

In parallel to blogging about creating my young adult/middle grade novel, Sammy and The San Juan Express, I will be blogging about my current writing activity—which is, creating an agent query letter. Kapow! It’s done. Not without grinding of teeth and cursing at critique groups comments (Not to worry, I’m most appreciative). But, three week into summarizing a 65,000 word adventure novel into three short paragraphs (266 words), many readings and many revisions, it’s ready to be sent out.  

Now to compile a list of YA/MG agents, customize my email for each agent, and send them out. Nervous? Yes. Sweaty palms? Not yet, but I’m sure I will be when I push the send button.