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Back from Publishing Pandemonium

20150318_142459
It’s been some time since I’ve updated my writer’s blog. Last post I was traveling in Thailand and Cambodia, gathering information and inspiration for a new Sammy novel. Since I returned, over a year ago, I’ve been busy publishing the first in the Sammy and the San Juan Express series—Seals the Deal. I thought writing was a challenge until I waded into the world of publishing. Little did I know the work that would be involved in contacting agents, talking with publishers, and ultimately learning publishing and the world of marketing books. I’m happy to say, the novel is now available at www.sanjuanexpress.com, Amazon.com, and at Barnes & Noble online. in both paperback and Kindle.

Do first time writers have a chance in the world of publishing if they don’t know anyone in the industry? Little, I would say. I contacted almost one hundred agents, only to receive almost one hundred rejections, some, I should say, with nice compliments, but no takers. I gave up after that and want directly to online publishing.

I’m now finishing book two in the Sammy series and may try again with traditional publishing. I’ll keep you posted.

Snowball

Holiday Cheer
Holiday Cheer — 

My writing partner gave me a wonderful holiday card that’s worth sharing.

SNOWBALL

I made myself a snowball

As perfect as could be.

I thought I’d keep it as a pet

And let it sleep with me. 

I made it some pajamas

And a pillow for its head.

Then last night it ran away,

But first it wet the bed. 

                       BY: Shel Silverstein

Laugh through the holidays. 

How I Prepare To Query Literary Agents

Picture Nickolai Vasilieff, AuthorIn a writer’s critique group I presented my Agent Query process. I hadn’t realized how comprehensive and time consuming the process had been over the past three months. I thought it might be helpful to others. 

I begin by completing my manuscript. It has had a multitude of readings over the past years by many fellow writers and friends. It is ready to send out

I then prepared a query letter using research online at:

Many agents request a query letter only, but some also asked for a synopsis—your kidding, right? Nope, absolutely true, and when you think about it, with all the queries they receive, reading a synopsis before requesting a partial or full manuscript makes sense. I researched and created a two page(ish) synopsis of my 66,000 word novel. I used the same resources listed for researching the query letter.  

Finally, having finished my novel, and creating a query letter and synopsis, I am ready to send them out … almost. Yet another step is acquiring or building a database of agents. (I’m estimating the next few steps take about one hour per agent, after creating the query and synopsis). I identify agencies that handle novels for my market, Young Adult and Middle Grade, and enter them in a spreadsheet. The resources I use for my agent research are: 

Once I compile my database (I build it fifty names at a sitting), I research each agency to identify the specific agent I will query, their current authors (hoping to find something similar to my work), and personalize my query. I also, very carefully, read their submission requirements, (some want query only, some want query and synopsis, some want query, synopsis, and partial manuscript). I give them exactly what they ask for. 

Finally, after this time consuming, but fruitful, exercise, I email (or mail) my query to the agent (I’ve sent out twenty so far). 

Enough already, I’m exhausted. Time for a coffee break, then back to agent queries for Sammy and The San Juan Express

Idea for Sammy and The San Juan Express

Life Is Good
Life Is Good

Where did the idea for Sammy and The San Juan Express come from? Years ago I vacationed with my two children in the San Juan Islands. We’d spend two or more weeks on a 28′ Chris Craft with a small sailing dinghy in tow. It was magical watching how they adapted to their new environment. Two urban kids suddenly transformed into sailors, fisherman, divers, and explorers. During the day they would swim in warm coves, or spend lazy afternoons in the dinghy. In the evenings, with no television or radio, we’d play card games, and I would make up stories about pirates, goblins, and lost children living on the islands. And so, some thirty years ago, the seeds of The San Juan Express were planted. Many years later, they began to sprout. 

Elevator Pitch on the back of my business card

SAMMY and The San Juan Express (On the beach)
Sammy on the Beach

What is Sammy and The San Juan Express? As a critique partner put it, “A young adult, middle grade novel about an orphan girl.”

The elevator pitch on the back of my business card:  Thirteen year old Sammy is faced with her mother’s death, a drunken father, and being shipped off to live with her uncle, a bush pilot in the San Juan Islands. In two enlightening weeks she saves a sea lion, uncovers a plot to kill seals, is kidnapped to be murdered, and discovers her hidden gift. Only her strength, courage, wits, and a little help from her friends above and below water, determines whether she dies or lives to enjoy her new found power.

Creating Agent Query Letters

Sammy and The San Juan Express — Float Plane — Angie
Angie, Uncle Teddy’s float plane —

In parallel to blogging about creating my young adult/middle grade novel, Sammy and The San Juan Express, I will be blogging about my current writing activity—which is, creating an agent query letter. Kapow! It’s done. Not without grinding of teeth and cursing at critique groups comments (Not to worry, I’m most appreciative). But, three week into summarizing a 65,000 word adventure novel into three short paragraphs (266 words), many readings and many revisions, it’s ready to be sent out.  

Now to compile a list of YA/MG agents, customize my email for each agent, and send them out. Nervous? Yes. Sweaty palms? Not yet, but I’m sure I will be when I push the send button.

The beginning of a new novel (six years past)

Nickolai Vasilieff Writing Mekong River Laos
Writing on the Mekong River, Laos ’06

10-31-14
Some years ago I began a young adult novel. I had a story in my head and it asked to be let out. I had no idea that I was releasing a monster. An exciting, beautiful monster to be sure, but monster non-the-less. I called it, Sammy and The San Juan Express.

I had written professional articles and interviews for many years, and I’d maintained an around-the-world travel blog, but this was my first full length fiction work. I figured I’d get the story down on paper, then do some edits and maybe, if I was lucky, get it published. Hell, I actually was pretty sure I’d get it published.

Six years later, I’m crossing t’s and dotting i’s, and preparing agent query letters. My optimism has been replaced with realism and I’m hoping someone, out of the hundreds of agents I’ll be contacting, will read my query and want to see my manuscript. As for being sure I’ll be published by a traditional publisher, that’s been replaced with the realization that anyone can write a story, but only a true writer can make it a novel.

At the encouragement of a friend, and as I begin to send out my query letters, I’ll tell you about my journey from business non-fiction writer to novelist, and bring you along as I learn out how difficult finding an agent really is.

SIX YEARS AGO:
I began my journey with a simple synopsis, and research. I wrote my idea for a story, on my computer. It covered about twenty pages. I also went online and searched for anything I could find that might educate me on how to write a novel. It began with excitement and anticipation of an extraordinary story that might take three to six months to complete. I was surprised on many levels.

More to follow:

New domain (www.nickolaivasilieff.com)

Writer in thought
Deep in thought off the south coast of New Zealand

Yet another domain (www.nickolaivasilieff.com). I’ve been thinking about this for a long time and I’m slowly builidng my platform for both freelance business writing and the release of my upcoming YA novel—Sammy and The San Juan Express. The latest addition—a new domain name. Why isn’t this easier? I’ll keep you posted and maybe we can figure this out together.