Tag Archives: books

Tracking My Emotional Response to Agent Query Emails

Sammy and The San Juan Express—Creed
Sammy’s Creed—

I’m sendin out an average of five agent queries a day. As I do the research and prepare each letter, I’m also watching the emotional roller coaster ride I’m taking. Emotions are important to me, partially because of my training as a counselor, and mostly because my protagonist in, Sammy and The San Juan Express, is a highly emotional being.

This morning, I noticed that for some agents I’m positive and feel good about sending my query. I can hardly wait to hit the send button. I know they will respond soon with a request for my manuscript. Then, I bump into someone who represents the best writers I’ve ever  known, or their credentials include a doctorate in English Lit, and my self confidence falls through the floor. I can barely type their email address let alone include the first fifty pages, which I’m sure should be thrown in the dumpster or deleted immediately.

Reality check— take a deep breath, stand, stretch, downward dog or a short walk. I have to remind myself that agents, as my daughter said, “put their pants on one leg at a time.” The truth is, agents need good writers. They’re looking for the next Harry Potter or The Book Thief, and every query holds the promise of being just that—even mine (or yours). So back at it you bad-boy or girl. Click those keys, search those agents, and with the confidence of J. K. Rolling, get those queries out—now.

How I Prepare To Query Literary Agents

Picture Nickolai Vasilieff, AuthorIn a writer’s critique group I presented my Agent Query process. I hadn’t realized how comprehensive and time consuming the process had been over the past three months. I thought it might be helpful to others. 

I begin by completing my manuscript. It has had a multitude of readings over the past years by many fellow writers and friends. It is ready to send out

I then prepared a query letter using research online at:

Many agents request a query letter only, but some also asked for a synopsis—your kidding, right? Nope, absolutely true, and when you think about it, with all the queries they receive, reading a synopsis before requesting a partial or full manuscript makes sense. I researched and created a two page(ish) synopsis of my 66,000 word novel. I used the same resources listed for researching the query letter.  

Finally, having finished my novel, and creating a query letter and synopsis, I am ready to send them out … almost. Yet another step is acquiring or building a database of agents. (I’m estimating the next few steps take about one hour per agent, after creating the query and synopsis). I identify agencies that handle novels for my market, Young Adult and Middle Grade, and enter them in a spreadsheet. The resources I use for my agent research are: 

Once I compile my database (I build it fifty names at a sitting), I research each agency to identify the specific agent I will query, their current authors (hoping to find something similar to my work), and personalize my query. I also, very carefully, read their submission requirements, (some want query only, some want query and synopsis, some want query, synopsis, and partial manuscript). I give them exactly what they ask for. 

Finally, after this time consuming, but fruitful, exercise, I email (or mail) my query to the agent (I’ve sent out twenty so far). 

Enough already, I’m exhausted. Time for a coffee break, then back to agent queries for Sammy and The San Juan Express

Elevator Pitch on the back of my business card

SAMMY and The San Juan Express (On the beach)
Sammy on the Beach

What is Sammy and The San Juan Express? As a critique partner put it, “A young adult, middle grade novel about an orphan girl.”

The elevator pitch on the back of my business card:  Thirteen year old Sammy is faced with her mother’s death, a drunken father, and being shipped off to live with her uncle, a bush pilot in the San Juan Islands. In two enlightening weeks she saves a sea lion, uncovers a plot to kill seals, is kidnapped to be murdered, and discovers her hidden gift. Only her strength, courage, wits, and a little help from her friends above and below water, determines whether she dies or lives to enjoy her new found power.

Creating Agent Query Letters

Sammy and The San Juan Express — Float Plane — Angie
Angie, Uncle Teddy’s float plane —

In parallel to blogging about creating my young adult/middle grade novel, Sammy and The San Juan Express, I will be blogging about my current writing activity—which is, creating an agent query letter. Kapow! It’s done. Not without grinding of teeth and cursing at critique groups comments (Not to worry, I’m most appreciative). But, three week into summarizing a 65,000 word adventure novel into three short paragraphs (266 words), many readings and many revisions, it’s ready to be sent out.  

Now to compile a list of YA/MG agents, customize my email for each agent, and send them out. Nervous? Yes. Sweaty palms? Not yet, but I’m sure I will be when I push the send button.

The beginning of a new novel (six years past)

Nickolai Vasilieff Writing Mekong River Laos
Writing on the Mekong River, Laos ’06

10-31-14
Some years ago I began a young adult novel. I had a story in my head and it asked to be let out. I had no idea that I was releasing a monster. An exciting, beautiful monster to be sure, but monster non-the-less. I called it, Sammy and The San Juan Express.

I had written professional articles and interviews for many years, and I’d maintained an around-the-world travel blog, but this was my first full length fiction work. I figured I’d get the story down on paper, then do some edits and maybe, if I was lucky, get it published. Hell, I actually was pretty sure I’d get it published.

Six years later, I’m crossing t’s and dotting i’s, and preparing agent query letters. My optimism has been replaced with realism and I’m hoping someone, out of the hundreds of agents I’ll be contacting, will read my query and want to see my manuscript. As for being sure I’ll be published by a traditional publisher, that’s been replaced with the realization that anyone can write a story, but only a true writer can make it a novel.

At the encouragement of a friend, and as I begin to send out my query letters, I’ll tell you about my journey from business non-fiction writer to novelist, and bring you along as I learn out how difficult finding an agent really is.

SIX YEARS AGO:
I began my journey with a simple synopsis, and research. I wrote my idea for a story, on my computer. It covered about twenty pages. I also went online and searched for anything I could find that might educate me on how to write a novel. It began with excitement and anticipation of an extraordinary story that might take three to six months to complete. I was surprised on many levels.

More to follow:

Sammy and The San Juan Express

IMG_3418
Sammy on the Beach

Samantha (Sammy)  Carlisle’s world is turned upside down with the traumatic death of her mother. Her father, a gulf war veteran, is lost in anger and alcoholism. At thirteen Sammy is alone, frightened and abandoned. In her most desperate moment, she and her seven year old brother are sent to live with their Uncle Teddy, a bush pilot, in the San Juan Islands. The adventure begins.

Just two weeks in the Islands and Sammy’s world transforms from absolute  grief to an awakening that leads to a fight for survival and if she succeeds, finding herself.

Along the way she meets a federal agent who in her words, “looks like a female Indiana Jones,” she meets a pathologist from the National Animal Crime Scene Investigation unit, meets a woman who, through experiencing a similar loss,  becomes a sister, and encounters a marine biologist whose southern drawl carries Sammy to the realization that she can do anything.

Most importantly, Sammy discovers  a special sensitivity to animals that opens doors to a new world. “You’re special,” her mother told her, and she now learns just how special she is.

Sammy also finds plenty of trouble along the way. “There are pirates in these waters,” Uncle Teddy told her, and she soon learns how dangerous modern day pirates can be. Thugs and killers might have been a better description. Whether she lives or dies depends on her wits and courage, and on the new family she’s gathered around her.

High adventure on the high-seas of the San Juan Islands. A must read for any eight to fourteen year old.